Suspension for gyroscopes

Abstract

Claims

April 3, 1956 W. D. JEWELL SUSPENSION FOR GYROSCOPES Filed May 23, 1952 INVENTOE. WENDELL ID. JEWELL WTIOPMEY United States Patent 2,740,299 sUsrENsroN Fon GYRoscoPEs- Wendel] D. JewelLLynhrook; N; Y assignor toA'merimn The present invention relates Ito gyroscope suspension, and'has particular reference to anovel suspension by means of which correcting torquesfmaybe appliedtoa gyro: The basic operation of a gyro compass employing resilient mechanical connections between the gyro casing anditsfollow' up members'to cause precession of the gyro upon offsetting of the follow up members from the gyro is fully explained in the copending application, Serial No. 128,366, filed November 19, 1949 for Gy'roscopic Compass"by"Ronald L. Bishop. The presentinvention is'an improvement over the means shown in the copendingj'application for the mechanical torsion wire connectionsbetweenflthe gyroscope and the follow up member. In"each'invention'the weight of the gyroscope-is sup.- ported by. immersing the gyroscope casing in neutral flotatiomin'aliquid contained in a tank, which is the follow" upmember. The present invention is particularly. suited for stable verticalsof'the type suggested by the copendi ng. applicationpreviously referred to, and will be described-tor that particular embodiment, although its use can head vantageouslyextended to gyro compasses and free g yros with appropriate changes well recognized by those .famil iar with the art of tgyroscopes. Inithe'preferred embodiment of the invention; .a ver-' tical spin axis gyroscope wheel is contained in each of-two casings, disposedone above the other, which are adapted toreceive the'crossedwire suspension between-them in a"horizontal position. The crossed-wire suspension is composed "of "four wires extending between thegyro casings and the follow up member. Each of the four-wires is bentin' the form of the letter L' and all are joined by an insulator at the bend of the the assembly resembles a cross. Two opposite pairs of wires-are mechanically connected across a diameterof the .follow up, member while the remainingtwo opposite are connected across a diameter of the gyroscope casing. The wires are preferably electrically insulated from one another to provide. four separate pathsfor the con-- duction of electrical power to the gyroscope. The present invention also allows elimination ofone gimbal ring. fdrmerly'required thereby resulting in a smaller-more With reference to Figure 1 of the drawings in'whicha gyro vertical einbodying the present invention'is shown, numeraldesignates a gyro casing composed of'two' hermetically sealed half spheres 10a and 10b, each'con L in a manner suchthat. 2" taini-n'g avertical spin axis gyro 19' and 21} respectively. The gyro casing-10 is immersed in a fluid 11,.contained within a spherical tank or follow up member 12- which is shown partly broken away to reveal the casing 10, which is suspended in approximate neutral flotation therein. The tank 12 issup'ported in horizontalgimbal ring 13 by the horizontal shafts-14,1 ISand-the gimbal ring 13 is, in turn, supported byshafts 16,"17 in supports 18'Which-are secured-to the deck of thevehicle in which the stable vertical is carriedl Shafts 14, Marc erpendicular toshafts 16, 17. The sphere 10 is 'conn'ect'ed to the tank 12 by means of the wiresuspension 21 which comprisesthe presentinvention. By meansof this su'spension' 21, the torques for causing the spin aites of the giyros to precess towards the'true vertical arelapp'lied to the; gyros by displacing the follow up rriember (tank 12) relatively to the gyro casing '10, as will 'be described. Sphere'12 carriest'we pickup devices '22'and 23 Which may be of the rotary induction type. Pendulums 24 and 25 are'cohnected 'to the 'rot'orsof t'he pickupdevices 22 and 23, so that the pickups 22 and 23 are responsive to tilts'of the'ta'n'k' 12 from the vertical in the vertical planes parallel to' the axes through sh'afts14, 1S and 16, 17 respectively. The endulu'ms are damped in order to decrease their sensitivityto "oscillations. Tank 12 also carrie pickup"windingsze; 27 each of which is wound in the form of theniimeral 8 andilocated in the field of infiu'e'nce 'of'an"elect'romag ne't '28 which is energized by alternating current'a'n'dis caified'by' the casing. .10. A displacement of the gyro icas'in'g .10' with respect to the tank '12 about the ;axes through shafts 14, 15 and shafts 16; 17 develops a' voltage" proportional in magnitude to the amount of displacement and correspondingin phase to'the direction of1disp1'atiementin pickups 26 and 27 respectively. 'Tliep'iokup, and magnet device may be of the 'type disclosed anddescrib'ed in U. 8. Patent No; 2,421,247 issued Mag/127.1947, for example. A'moto'r'29 is carriedfbyijthe support 18 and is connected to drive the gimbal ring 13 about -the-pivots of shaft'sfll, -17 while a motor 30, carried'by the gimbal ring 13, drives the spherical tank lz about; the pivots of shafts "14 and .15. In operation motor29 is energized jointlyby'the pickupgwinding 27 and the pendulum pickup 23 while motor 39 is energizedfiointly bythe pickup winding .26 and pendulum pickup- 2 2. With reference now to Figure 2,-the'ta-nk 12 is shownin section to-reveal the gyrocasingltllof which one halt 1021 has been removed in'order to-show the suspension" ZI "more clearly; The two similar :half spheres- =10a and- 10b arenormallysecured-together bymeans of dogs 32,- for example, of which only one 'is-shown*or by any other convenient means. Thehalf sphere 10b has twoorthogonal channels 33, 34 in the flat surface thereof in which the wires 35, 36, 37' and 38 of the wire suspension 2-1 a're'located: One end of each of the-wires 35,- 36 is attached to the sphere :10 bythe clamping device 39,- opposite thereto one end of-each'of the wires 37 and 38isattached to the sphere 10 by the clamping device the clamping device 42. The all clamped-together near the geometrical center of the spherical shell 10, preferably glass bead connector is at substantially the spin axis of the gyroscope. The glass head 43 is'p'ref'erably formed by first fusi-ngL ajsm'all glas's bead abot'itleach wire- 35, 3 d, 37 and 38 as; indicatedby'the dotted lines in Fig. 3 and then fusing all and diametrically bybeingfused into a glass bead connector 43 as seen more clearlyin Fig. 3. This four beads into one. This method provides for ease of assembly of the wire suspension 21. The clamping devices 39, 40, 41 and 42 are all similar, and are all constructed in the manner of Fig. 3, in which a detailed view, partly in section, of the clamping device 39 is shown. Glass beads 44 and 45 are fused about the wires 35 and 36 respectively. The glass beads 44 and 45 are embedded in a cementitious preparation 46 which is contained in the tube 47. The tube 47 is suspended from the sphere by the leaf spring 43, which is permanently fixed to the sphere 10 by means of screws, for example. The tube 47 is preferably adjustable with respect to the spring 48 so that the tension on the wires 35, 36, 37 and 38 can be easily regulated. Thus, the tube 47 is held between the straps 49 and 53 which are fastened to the spring 48. Loosening of the straps 49 and 50 by unscrewing bolt 51 permits movement of the tube 47, whereas subsequent tightening of the straps 49 and 50 by means of bolt 51 holds the tube 47 firmly in place. The clamping devices 41 and 42 are shown as being suspended from supports 52 and 53 respectively in the tank 12. Other means may be used such as connecting the leaf springs directly to the tank surface if desired, but care must be taken to preserve the tightness of tank 12 to prevent loss of liquid 11. The leaf springs 48 maintain a predetermined constant tension on the wires 35, 36, 37 and 38 primarily to provide a reasonable force gradient along the gyro axis tending to center the gyro casing 10 within the tank 12. The operation of the gyro vertical equipped with a wire suspension, such as 21, may be understood from the following simplified description. It must be realized that the erection of the spin axis is not as simple an operation as herein described but is a more complex action. The present invention however concerns itself only with the wire suspension 21 so that the simplified operational description will be sufficient to illustrate its use. A complete description of the operation of a gyro compass which uses a torsion Wire suspension is contained in the previously referred to application, Serial No. 128,366, and reference thereto may help in understanding the function of the torsion wires. When the gyro 19, 20 is tilted out of the vertical about an axis through shafts 16, 17 for example, the tank 12 is driven by motor 29 to a position where the output of pickup 27 is zero, or until the position of tank 12 corresponds to the position of gyro 19, 20. The resulting tilt of tank 12 is sensed by the pendulum pickup 22 which energizes motor 30 to drive tank 12 about the axis through shafts 14, thereby displacing tank 12 with respect to the gyro 19, 20 and producing a voltage in pickup windings 26. The voltage of windings 26 opposes that of pendulum pickup 22 and motor 30 therefore drives the tank 12 until the pickup 26 voltage .is equal to that of the pendulum pickup 22 output. As a result, the tank 12 is displaced from the gyro casing 10 so that the wires 35 to 38 are twisted about an axis through clamps 39 and 40. The twisted wires 35 through 38 therefore apply a torque to the gyro 19, 20 which is in a direction such as to cause the gyro spin axis to precess towards the vertical about the axis 1617. Obviously, a tilt of the tank 12 about the axis 14, 15 displaces the pendulum pickup 23 from its null position to produce a voltage which energizes follow up motor 29. Tank 12 is therefore displaced from the gyro 19, 20 to twist the wires 35, 36, 37 and 38 about the axis through clamps 41, 42 and thereby causes the gyro spin axis to precess away from the verticals about the axis through shafts 1415. It will be seen that with suitable damping of the pendulums 24, 25 the gyro spin axis will erect into the vertical along a spiral path. Correcting torques for predictable errors such as earths rotation and ships motion are applied by energizing the motors 29 and 30 with properly scaled corresponding voltages jointly with the pickup voltages from windings 26, 27 to cause displacement of the 4 tank 12 from the gyro 10 and thereby twist the wires 35, 36, 37 and 33 to apply the torques to the gyro 19, 20. The gyro spin axis will settle in a position displaced slightly from the vertical by a small but known angle. A correction can be applied to the gyro position to correctly indicate the true vertical. The wires 35, 36, 37 and 38 are preferably made of a good electrical conductor and may be advantageously used to transmit electrical power to the gyroscope motors and pickup magnet 28. One end of wire 36 emerges through the clamping device 39 and .is connected tothe insulated leadin 54 to the half-sphere 10b. Similarly the wire 38 is also connected to an insulated leadin, 59 (Fig. 2) on the half-sphere 10b. The wires 35 and 37 are similarly connected to leadins on the other half sphere, not shown. The outer ends of wires 35, 36, 37 and 38 emerge through the clamping devices 41, 42 and areconnected to insulated leadins 55, 56, 57 and 58 respectively which are mounted on tank 12. It will be seen that the wires 35, 36, 37 and 33 are electrically insulated from one another in the clamping devices 39, 40, 41 and 42 and in the glass head 43, each wire provides a path for electrical power from outside tank 12 to the inside of sphere 10. The gyro motors, not shown, are therefore energized by connecting a source of power to leadins and 57 and to the leadins 56, 58. 7 2' The wires 35, 36, 37 and 38 must havereasonably good tensile strength, be good electrical conductors and must have the same thermal expansion properties as glass. Since these requirements are satisfactorily met by tungsten, the wires 35, 36, 37 and 38 are preferably made of that material. Although the invention has been illustrated by refer ence to a gyroscopic stable vertical, itis. not intended: to limit the invention thereby. The stable verticalfwas chosen as illustrative because the torque gradients about the horizontal axes are equal and the description is relatively simple. In gyro compasses, however, it is preferable to have the torque gradient about the vertical axis much than that about the horizontal axis. The wire suspension possessing such properties would require the wires extending vertically to have a cross section and spacing different from those of the horizontally extending wires. In this case the junction of the different wires would, of course, be imbedded in the glass head 43, preserving the four electrical paths provided by the wires 35, 36, 37 and 38'. I claim: 1 1. In a gyroscopic apparatus adapted to be mounted on an unstable support, the combination ofa gyroscope, a connector member on the spin axis of'the gyroscope, a follow up member, elastic elements connected to said connector and to said gyroscope at spaced points and an ela's} tic element connected to said connector and to said follow up member and suspending said gyroscope in said follow" up member for movement about an axis said follow up member being adapted to be mounted on said support for movement about coordinate axes. Y 2. In a gyroscopic apparatus adapted tofbe mounted on an unstable support, the combination of a gyroscope, a connector member on the spin axis of said gyroscopefa follow up member, torsion filaments connected to'said connector and to said gyroscope at spaced points and a torsion filament connected to said connector and to said follow up member and suspending said gyroscope .in said follow up member for movement about an axis, said follow up member being adapted to be mounted onsaid support for movement about coordinate axes. 3. In a gyroscopic. apparatus adapted to be mounted on an unstable support, the combination of a gyroscope, a follow up member, elastic elements connected to said gyroscope and to said follow up member and suspending said, gyroscope in said follow up member for movement about an axis, said follow up member being-adapted tobe mounted on said support for movement about coordinate axes, said elastic elements being connected to a common connector. 4. In a gyroscopic apparatus adapted to be mounted on an unstable support, the combination of a gyroscope, a follow up member, elastic elements connected to said gyroscope and to said follow up member and suspending said gyroscope in said follow up member for movement about coordinate axes, said follow up member being adapted to be mounted on said support for movement about coordinate axes, said elastic elements being connected to a common connector. 5. In a gyroscopic apparatus adapted to be mounted on an unstable support, the combination of a gyroscope, a follow up member, elastic elements connected to said gyroscope and to said follow up member and suspending said gyroscope in said follow up member for movement about perpendicular axes, said follow up member being adapted to be mounted on said support for movement about coordinate axes, said elastic elements being connected to a common connector. 6. In a gyroscopic apparatus adapted to be mounted on an unstable support, the combination of a gyroscope, a follow up member, elastic elements connected to said gyroscope and to said follow up member and suspending said gyroscope in said follow up member for movement about an axis, said follow up member being adapted to be mounted on said support for movement about coordinate axes, said elastic elements being connected to a common connector at substantially the spin axis of said gyroscope. 7. In a gyroscopic apparatus adapted to be mounted on an unstable support, the combination of a gyroscope, a follow up member, elastic elements connected to said gyroscope and to said follow up member and suspendnected to a common connector at substantially the spin axis of said gyroscope. 8. In a gyroscopic apparatus adapted to be mounted on an unstable support, the combination of a gyroscope, a follow up member, elastic elements connected to said gyroscope and to said follow up member and suspending said gyroscope in said follow up member for movement about perpendicular axes, said follow up member being adapted to be mounted on said support for movement about coordinate axes, said elastic elements being connected to a common connector at substantially the spin axis of said gyroscope. 9. In a gyroscopic apparatus adapted to be mounted on an unstable support, the combination of a gyroscope casing comprising a pair of hermetically sealed sections, a spin axis gyro in each of said sections, a follow up member for said gyroscope casing, an elastic element connected to said gyroscope casing and to said follow up member and suspending said gyroscope in said follow up member for movement about an axis, said follow up member being adapted to be mounted on said support for movement about coordinate axes. 10. In a gyroscopic apparatus adapted to be mounted on an unstable support, the combination of a gyroscope casing comprising a pair of hermetically sealed sections, a spin axis gyro in each of said sections, a follow up member for said gyroscope casing, a plurality of elastic elements connected to said gyroscope casing and to said follow up member and suspending said gyroscope in said follow up member for movement about an axis, said follow up member being adapted to be mounted on said support for movement about coordinate axes. 11. In a gyroscopic apparatus adapted to be mounted on an unstable support, the combination of a gyroscope casing comprising a pair of hermetically sealed sections, a spin axis gyro in each of said sections, a follow up member for said gyroscope casing, a plurality of elastic elements connected to said gyroscope casing and to said follow up member and suspending said gyroscope in said follow up member for movement about an axis, said follow up member being adapted to be mounted on said support for movement about coordinate axes, said elastic elements being connected to a common connector. 12. In a gyroscopic apparatus adapted to be mounted on an unstable support, the combination of a gyroscope casing comprising a pair of hermetically sealed sections, a spin axis gyro in each of said sections, a follow up member for said gyroscope casing, a plurality of elastic elements connected to said gyroscope casing and to said follow up member and suspending said gyroscope in said follow up member for movement about an axis, said follow up member being adapted to be mounted on said support for movement about coordinate axes at substantially the spin axis of said gyroscope. 13. In a gyroscopic apparatus adapted to be mounted on an unstable support, the combination of a gyroscope, a follow-up member, a plurality of elastic elements, one end of said elastic elements being connected to said gyroscope, the other end of said elastic elements being connected to said follow-up member and means for joining said elements at their center. 14. In a gyroscopic apparatus adapted to be mounted on an unstable support, the combination of a gyroscope, a follow-up member, a plurality of elastic elements, each of said elastic elements comprising two electrically conducting torsion filaments, one end of said elements being connected to said gyroscope, the other end of said elements being connected to said follow-up member, said elements being mechanically joined in a common connector, one filament of each of said elements being electrically connected to the other filament of said element. 15. In a gyroscopic apparatus adapted to be mounted on an unstable support, the combination of a gyroscope, a follow-up member, a plurality of elastic elements, each of said elastic elements being connected to said gyroscope and to said follow-up member and means for mechanically connecting each of said elastic elements together at substantially the spin axis of the gyroscope, but leaving said elastic elements electrically separated. References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,981,687 Caster Nov. 20, 1934 2,209,735 Lauck July 30, 1940 2,311,652 Esval Feb. 23, 1943 2,419,948 Haskins May 6, 1947 2,517,612 Varian Aug. 8, 1950 2,598,672 Braddon June 3, 1952

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    US-2959059-ANovember 08, 1960Bosch Arma CorpGyro suspension
    US-2967430-AJanuary 10, 1961Hycon Mfg CompanyStabilizer gimbals
    US-2992562-AJuly 18, 1961Bosch Arma CorpGyroscopic suspension
    US-3002392-AOctober 03, 1961Bosch Arma CorpGyroscope suspension
    US-3097535-AJuly 16, 1963Space Technology Lab IncTransducing and control systems
    US-3276268-AOctober 04, 1966Clary CorpGyroscopic instrument
    US-3522736-AAugust 04, 1970Tokyo Keiki KkGyroscopic instrument